[KINDLE] ✽ Eon By Greg Bear – Realestatelawcenter.us

EonDan Verschijnt Plotseling De Steen, Een Geheimzinnige Astero De Van Driehonderd Kilometer Lengte Die Zich In Een Baan Om De Aarde Nestelt Wetenschappers Ontdekken Dat De Steen Is Verdeeld In Zeven Reusachtige Kamers Waarvan Sommige Complete Bossen, Rivieren En Zelfs Hangende Steden Herbergen, En Een Bibliotheek Die De Dood Beschrijft, De Laatste Oorlog De Zevende Kamer Bevat De Uit Mathematische Stof Opgebouwde Weg, Die In Lengterichting Oneindig Is Deze Weg Blijkt Van Levensbelang Voor Pavel Minski Omdat De Weg De Belofte Van Een Verkenning Tussen De Sterren Inhoudt Voor Gary Lanier En Judith Hoffman Als Een Mogelijkheid Om De Dood Te Voorkomen Of, Als Dat Niet Zal Lukken, Een Nieuwe Wereld Op Te Bouwen En Voor Patricia Vasquez Omdat De Weg Een Route Belichaamt Naar Een Parallel Aarde Maar Op De Weg Wacht Een Nieuwe Verschrikking, Een Miljoen Kilometer Verderop.

    10 thoughts on “[KINDLE] ✽ Eon By Greg Bear – Realestatelawcenter.us


  1. says:

    Review ReduxThere should be a picture of Eon in the dictionary right next to Sense of wonder SF.Reading this book was like listening to a complicated symphony Eon opens as a near future artifact, or big dumb object, tale largely inspired by Rendezvous With Rama The novel then progresses through a number of movements, each mind numbing and awe inspiring than the previous It is therefore no great surprise that the book eventually evolves or devolves, depending on your point of view from Hard Science Fiction to a form of Space Opera Then, of course, there is the grand finale, which is really something else.Like the early Uplift novels by David Brin Eon seems to be a bridge between old school and the new as far as Science Fiction is concerned I am by no means a buff Anyway, I really enjoyed the novel It embodies what I have come to love about Sci Fi There was a lot about the novel I didn t understand at all, but I was awed Another work I was reminded of while reading this was Ringworld Larry Niven It was a challenge to envision what I was reading, but getting there is part of the thrill.Despite the dated cold war politics, which seems to be a grievance to som...


  2. says:

    Pronounced yawn.


  3. says:

    There s a thing in science fiction called the Big Dumb Object which always provokes awe and a sense of wonder and all that, and Eon is all about one of those They re called big dumb objects because boys of all ages love them, their eyes go all glazey thinking about the size, power and size of these things and all the author has to do is make sure their alien object is really really big Works every time Boys love size breasts, penises, brothers, breakfasts, all good as long as they re big So, for instance, Rama in Arthur Clarke s Rama books is one, the Ringworld in Ringworld by Larry Niven is another, the house in House of Leaves is one, apparently there s a giant black hole known as the Unicron singularity in Transformers Cybertron so that s another, and it goes on and on Every invasion of earth has a big dumb object in the sky called a spaceship So in Eon you get a big asteroid thing hanging up there in the sky which when they go and investigate they find it s bigger inside than it is outside.Ooooh.Probably things that a...


  4. says:

    I ve been amazed at the number of readers that have been so underwhelmed by Eon This astounding book was published in 1984 and did not anticipate the end of the Cold War, only half a decade away Some say, with self righteousness nurtured by hindsight, that this is a major flaw in this book But most sleepwalking Americans, at the time, had no clue of the Eurasian and Eastern European realities of the times This is not Greg Bear s fault It was, and is, the result of the political propaganda, still alive, fed to the public in large doses What is forgotten is that from the Cold War assumptions seen by the average, contemporary, 1984 world citizens however blind to the evident realities of Russian Soviet internal decay and near collapse the times still presented a very, very real global threat of planetary atomic annihilation Some folks today, still argue that very similar, very real threats of atomic annihilation, fueled by other multi polar realities oil shortages, water shortages, cultural chauvinism, etc , still exist and never really went away And, for that reason alone, this book is still very contemporary In fact, one can intelligently argue that mankind is still very, very close to destroying itself in a number of frighteningly different ways The Cold War itself is immaterial to that threat of self destruction.The near collapse of mankind, in the very near future, is the premise of this book by Greg Bear This Hard Science Fiction, or New Space Opera speculates along t...


  5. says:

    Of course, she said It s like touching the square root of space time Try to enter the singularity, and you translate yourself through a distance along some spatial coordinate You slide along, Farley said Right I never tried touching the square root of space time before so I cannot attest to whether it is in any way similar to trying to enter the singularity which I have also never attempted for some reason Still, as an avid sci fi reader I like reading the odd bits of technobabble as long as they do not overwhelm the book to the point of rendering it unreadable I like how Greg Bear makes that bit of dialog sound as if it makes sense It s just cool fits my conception of cool any way Eon is a classic sci fi book featuring one of the most beloved tropes of the genre, the Big Dumb Object A gigantic alien construct that shows up in the vicinity of our Earth, the origin or purpose of which is unknown It is interesting to compare Eon to Arthur C Clarke s Rendezvous with Rama Clarke s book is all about the B.D.O and the group of characters exploration and adventures inside of it Explorations and adventures inside The Stone the name humans give to the gigantic asteroid shaped B.D.O are also featured in Eon but they constitute less than half of what this book is about The fate of Earth and humanity also become involved as the USA claim prior right to manage the exploration...


  6. says:

    Having read Blood Music, and now Eon, the impression I am getting of Greg Bear is that he has good ideas, sets them up well, but has no follow through and no idea how to end his stories I really enjoyed the first half of Eon mysteries and characters introduced and developed well, and some convincing and tense action and politics I was convinced that Eon was going to be a really good read Perhaps it was these early high hopes that caused my later disappointment.As the book progresses, things seems to unravel The science behind the main premise of the story is presented in a reasonably convincing way, but some of the other scientific technological advances are just silly and undermine the whole book top of the list of offenders being The Mystery , which made me cringe in a way I haven t cringed since Qui Gon Jinn explained the Force via midichlorians And Bear really should have stopped to find out what it is actually like being a mathematician, before basing this story around a brilliantly gifted mathematician, then he might have been able to do something a little convincing than have her lie down and close her eyes when it was time for her to work her magic.Towards the end of th...


  7. says:

    Here s a parody of all the male written sci fi I abandon They looked upon a very important object it had lines and was a colour She reached out and touched a thing Wow, said Russian Democratic Federal Leader of the Military Defence of the Milky Way Leader, Tessa Baryshnikov There s a hole on this end and the other That s right, said NATO official Chinese Democracy of the International Order of Space Division Center, Third Division Demilitarised Antigravity Chief, Steve Jiaolong So that must mean Schwartzfeld s theory of antimatter propulsion holds up in two dimensions for periods of time significant enough for five of string theory s folded dimensions to balance out Allowing the former owners of this vessel to travel across the universe using their own feet as a vector Is this a novel or a fucking astrophysics lecture she said, exposing her breasts I catch on quick It s bizarre, right he said, taking out his hard prick We all seem to reach conclusions about this stuff around us based on very little evidence As far as Leo can see It seems to him that the author just makes us discover what he wants to be the case at an unnatural rate so he doesn t sacrifice pacing Like, what did you say about that thing It had two holes in it Maybe that wasn t even significant What else is even in this room They tried to picture it further but had not...


  8. says:

    I loved this book as a teenager young adult in the 80 s It was the awesomest thing I d read to that point, and it remained awesome in my memory I own a true first edition hardcover in fine condition actually pretty rare, especially in such good shape and it will remain one of the prized pieces of my book collection for a long time Eon also will remain one of the seminal sci fi works of the late 20th Century In retrospect its influence on later works is clear, its position as a pioneering work solid It helps that Greg Bear is a physicist and mathematician, and his knowledge impelled him to make use of modern theoretical physics in ways that previous sci fi authors couldn t but which every subsequent author would attempt to emulate and tune to their own songs The world building and here I must qualify, I mean in the Thistledown asteroid is fabulous For those of you who haven t read Eon, the asteroid appears in our solar system from another universe, one closely paralleling our own, and enters orbit around Earth We send people to investigate and discover seven hollowed out chambers full of cities, forests, mountains, deserts, and machinery The great wonder which you quickly discover so I m not really spoiling anything is that the seventh chamber goes on forever Re reading this book I felt like I was entering through the bore hole for the first time and experiencing the asteroid anew I was there, in the Thistledown, one...


  9. says:

    Hmmmmwhat to say about Eon UmmmmI finished it Does that count This was a selection for my local book club, as recommended by one of the members The premise sounded interesting, and so I jumped right in Andgood lordwhat a struggle I ll admit that the first 1 4th of the book captivated me The Stone was a cool mystery, and the science behind it was deep and engaging But then the mysteries started being solved, and the book became less interesting And as each new development happened, I found that I cared less and less Look, I don t want to take away anything from Greg Bear The dude can write the science part of speculative science fiction like nobody s business But the first chunk of the book is basically exposition in real time, and most of what happens ultimately has little to no consequence to the rest of the story The big cataclysmic event that takes place while our POV characters are on the Stone is so coldly rendered that it might as well have not even have happened.I commented to a fellow bookclub member that this book is very much a product of the time it was written In fact, it feels like it should have been written in the late 80 s than the mid 90 s, as the Cold War vibe is super strong, and the Russian antagonists just felt like lazy storytelling Even when we were following events from the perspective of Russian soldiers, it felt like a low budget 80 s action movie where e...


  10. says:

    I had issues with this book The first part was, of course, getting past the Soviet era antagonism and accepting it as what it was a convenient antagonist at the time I generally don t like books that have maps inside like maybe if the author was better at conveying a complicated story, then we wouldn t need a map This one DEFINITELY need a map I spent the entire damn thing trying to just understand the world they were moving around in Maybe that makes me stupid, but I don t know that s the case Even though he spends the whole first half of this 500 page novel describing things, I still couldn t really see what this world was supposed to look like That said, I willingly bungled my way through, accepting that the locations didn t matter as much as the characters and plot I came up a bit short there, as there really isn t much of a plot, at least, not in ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *